Asthma and Schools

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School has officially started for everyone across the United States.  In the United States, about 20 million people have asthma and nearly 6.3 million of them are children.  Children have smaller airways than adults making asthma especially serious for them.  We send our children off to daycare, pre-K, kindergarten, primary school and high school every weekday entrusting them to the school and teachers.

Parents of children with asthma know the importance of getting their child’s asthma symptoms under control and keeping it under control.  Keeping clear and open communication with your child’s school and teacher about their asthma is very important.  The first step you should take is to schedule a conference with your child’s school – we suggest before school starts, but it is NEVER too late to schedule meeting.  Be sure to include your child’s teachers, nurse, coaches, and any school assistants.  Ensure that all staff understand your child’s situation so they can better help keep their asthma under control.

Be sure that your child’s physician has a plan for your child to allow you to share with everyone who works with your child.  This plan should include any triggers, a list of medications that they take including the proper dosage, symptoms to watch for and emergency telephone numbers.  Also, be sure you know who is in charge of your child’s inhaler while they are at school in case there is an emergency they will know exactly where to find it.

Lastly, always communicate on a regular basis with the school and the staff!  Communication is key!  We hope that everyone has a safe, happy and fun filled school year!

We firmly believe in our company mission –  To combine the best technology and design, to turn our clients’ needs into innovative solutions for indoor atmospheres, whether for health reasons, comfort or to increase productivity.  Check us out at www.airfree.com for a purifier that will work best for you.

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