Asthma Statistics

d1191419fcfd1224355f0e6814f20aa0ae3eac0a793e5d1b51pimgpsh_fullsize_distr

Below are facts on asthma pulled directly from the World Health Organization (WHO) site:

Facts

  • According to WHO estimates, 235 million people suffer from asthma.
  • Asthma is the most common chronic disease among children.
  • Asthma is not just a public health problem for high income countries: it occurs in all countries regardless of level of development. Over 80% of asthma deaths occurs in low and lower-middle income countries.
  • Asthma is under-diagnosed and under-treated, creating a substantial burden to individuals and families and possibly restricting individuals’ activities for a lifetime.

Asthma is a chronic disease that is characterized by frequent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing.  The severity and frequency will vary from person to person with symptoms occurring several times a day/week and for some increase when doing physical activity or during the evening.  Those that are at risk for developing asthma are a combination of genetics and environmental exposure to inhaled substances and particles.

 

Indoor allergens like house dust mites found on bedding, blankets, carpets, furniture and pet dander along with tobacco smoke, chemicals used at jobs, pollens and molds, and air pollution are some of the substances and particles that can provoke allergic reactions that can irritate airways.  Other triggers for asthma include cold air, extreme anger or fear and exercise.

 

Asthma cannot be cured but it can be managed with medication.  Medication isn’t the only way to help control asthma – it is strongly suggested to avoid triggers.  While we can’t fully control outdoor air triggers we can certainly try to control our indoor air triggers and the best way to do this is by using an Airfree Air Purifier.

 

We invite you to browse our fine line of maintenance free air purifiers and find the best size to fit your home.  Please visit our website at: www.airfree.com

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Asthma. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s